City Fibre in Newark - FTTP Rollout

City Fibre in Newark - FTTP Rollout

 

City Fibre is investing £10m in Nottinghamshire town Newark's (on-Trent) FTTP ISP broadband network. This is part of their £4.9bn investment for 8 million premises over 285 cities, towns and villages by the end of 2025.

 

Now, you might be asking, why is Sky talking about a City Fibre roll-out? We're currently partnered with Openreachthe people who connect your homes, schools, hospitals, banks and more, to our network and the world.

 

The truth is that this roll-out comes at a perfect time to help our customers get to grips with the ever-changing world of broadband. So today we'll be discussing the differences between FTTP, FTTC and ADSL.

 

 

What's the difference between FTTP, FTTC and ADSL?

 

 

  • Speed: with every update to how broadband travels from the exchange to your home, the speed increases. With FTTC, you get download speeds of up to 1Gbps; with FTTC it's 330Mbps; and ADSL is 24Mbps.
  • Cable material: as you'll notice from the below diagram, the cable material has developed from copper lines to fibre-optic. Copper cables transmit signals via electrical pulses, whereas fibre-optic cables transmit signals via light pulses.
  • Installation: ADSL and FTTC are installed with a middle man; between the exchange and your home, there's the green cabinet that you might see on your street. FTTP is usually installed when it's been made available in your local area, with a Connectorised Block Terminal (CBT) nearby on telephone poles.

 

Alt Text: the difference between FTTP, FTTC and ADSL.Alt Text: the difference between FTTP, FTTC and ADSL.

 

 

How do I know what's best for me?

 

It's hard to know what's best for us, especially when we're being told 'get the best speeds' or 'you won't be able to live without this'. The truth of it is that every household will need different things. So we've come up with a few key benefits of FTTP, FTTC and ADSL.

 

Fibre to the Premise (FTTP)

 

  • GamingFTTP can allow for speeds of up to 1000mbps. Though it won't massively improve your ping times, when used correctly, FTTP will improve upstream speeds by a sizeable amount.
  • Streaming: now that streaming services have overtaken broadcast and cable TV, streaming is where it's at. A live stream usually requires download speeds of 40 Mbps.
  • 100 devices: you can connect up to 100 devices using FTTP, perfect for big households.
  • Working from Home: while all of these internet types support WFH in some capacity, FTTP offers its users a high upload and download speed. This means graphic designers, animators, video editors and jobs that require file sharing will be able to complete their tasks with efficiency,
  • Business: if you've opened up a cafe spot, it's worth getting FTTP purely for the stable, secure connection that customers will experience. It may be a little more costly, but if customers stay longer in your Internet cafe, this means better business.
  • House Price: if you're selling your house, having FTTP can become a strong selling-point of the property. It means the new owner will bypass installations, and be able to immediately experience the very best speeds available.
 
 

Fibre to the Cabinet (FTTC)

 

  • Streaming: now that streaming services have overtaken broadcast and cable TV, streaming is where it's at. A live stream usually requires download speeds of 40 Mbps.
  • Internet calls: if you use Zoom or Skype for WFH or catching up with friends and family, FTTC is a great option for staying connected.
  • 10 devices or more: the average household has nine connected devices, and FTTC supports those and more. This is perfect for the average working family household that needs to stream, do homework and do low-intensity gaming. 
  • Streaming: you can get high quality connections with superfast speeds up to 80 Mbps for downloads and 20 Mbps for uploads. This means its possible to stream live content in more than one room.

 

 

Copper network (ADSL)

 

  • Fixed lines: while wireless broadband may give instant connectivity, it doesn't have the same capabilities as fixed-line ADSL. Using an ethernet cable can ensure that all of that capability is driven straight to your set-top box or computer.
  • Internet calls: if you use Zoom or Skype for catching up with friends and family, ASDL offers relatively decent speeds for these delay-driven providers. 
  • Cost effectivea fantastic entry-level broadband, it won't have a massive impact on your finances, and will get you internet access through a stable connection.
 
 

How can I check if I've got FTTP available in my area?

 

If you're with Sky, you'll likely be getting FTTP through Openreach, so enter your full landline or postcode on Openreach's FTTP checker!

 

If you're with another provider, it's worth checking the BT Wholesale Availability checker!

 

 

Keep updated with @SkyHelpTeam!

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